On a warm, summery day.

This was my vague attempt at humour/horror combination. It’s, uhh, not very good, and this is after much tweaking. :/

It was a warm, summery day. The street, which was lined with trees, was full of crowds of people, shopping their hearts out, or just wishing they could afford that perfect dress. The men, the ones with the stuffed wallets, at least, were all tiredly trailing after the women, each daydreaming of their own “Wish I was there.” The tall, shady trees each sheltered a moody teenager, dressed all in black, with hands in pockets and headphones in ears. Young couples walked hand in hand, getting envious looks from the married couples, who had so carefully distanced themselves. There were groups of teenagers acting cool, swaggering from shop to shop, with the girls checking their appearances in each and every window, and the boys checking the girls appearance whenever they got the chance, both in the windows, and without.
As for me, I was here on my own. As much as I enjoyed watching the people interacting with each other (or themselves, as the case may be), that wasn’t why I had come. Taking a few steps forwards, I submerged myself in the crowd, blindly shoving through the masses of people, all dressed in the supposed latest fashions. I shut my eyes, blocking out the blinding sun for a moment, and looked again. The writhing mass of people were still there, but it felt different. The air had a chill to it.
Staring round, I noticed the blankness of each and every face. Typical Americans, I though, striding onwards, choosing to ignore the atmosphere that was developing. I made my way to the square, set in the center of all the shops. There were two worn benches in the square, set on opposite sides. One was occupied by a teenage couple who appeared to have nothing better to do than salivate over each other. The other was empty, so I sat, and pulled out a worn magazine from my bag. Focussing on the brightly coloured cartoons, remeniscent of my childhood, I barely noticed when the bubble of chatter, occasionally punctured by loud laughs, gradually got quieter and quieter, until the street was silent. I didn’t even notice when I started shivering, until a tap on my shoulder brought me back to reality.
I swivelled round slowly, realising the square, the shops, and the entire street were completely empty, save the face that hovered before me.
“Who are you?” I asked, not sure if I really wanted the answer. My voice was shaking.
“You don’t need to know.” Said the face, softly. Suddenly, there were two sets footsteps behind me. I turned, flailing my arms, but it was too late.
My whole world went black.


It was a warm, summery day. The street, which was lined with trees, was full of crowds of people, shopping their hearts out, or just wishing they could afford that perfect dress. The men, the ones with the stuffed wallets, at least, were all tiredly trailing after the women, each daydreaming of their own “Wish I was there.” The tall, shady trees each sheltered a moody teenager, dressed all in black, with hands in pockets and headphones in ears. Young couples walked hand in hand, getting envious looks from the married couples, who had so carefully distanced themselves. There were groups of teenagers acting cool, swaggering from shop to shop, with the girls checking their appearances in each and every window, and the boys checking the girls appearance whenever they got the chance, both in the windows, and without.
As for me, I was here on my own. As much as I enjoyed watching the people interacting with each other (or themselves, as the case may be), that wasn’t why I had come. Taking a few steps forwards, I submerged myself in the crowd, blindly shoving through the masses of people, all dressed in the supposed latest fashions. I shut my eyes, blocking out the blinding sun for a moment, and looked again. The writhing mass of people were still there, but it felt different. The air had a chill to it.
Staring round, I noticed the blankness of each and every face. Typical Americans, I though, striding onwards, choosing to ignore the atmosphere that was developing. I made my way to the square, set in the center of all the shops. There were two worn benches in the square, set on opposite sides. One was occupied by a teenage couple who appeared to have nothing better to do than salivate over each other. The other was empty, so I sat, and pulled out a worn magazine from my bag. Focussing on the brightly coloured cartoons, remeniscent of my childhood, I barely noticed when the bubble of chatter, occasionally punctured by loud laughs, gradually got quieter and quieter, until the street was silent. I didn’t even notice when I started shivering, until a tap on my shoulder brought me back to reality.
I swivelled round slowly, realising the square, the shops, and the entire street were completely empty, save the face that hovered before me.
“Who are you?” I asked, not sure if I really wanted the answer. My voice was shaking.
“You don’t need to know.” Said the face, softly. Suddenly, there were two sets footsteps behind me. I turned, flailing my arms, but it was too late.
My whole world went black.
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